Watch The First Episode Of Japanese Spider-Man

| 13 Jan 2015 16:30
japanese spiderman leopardon

Prepare to have your mind blown through your web shooters.

Last week, you may have joined in the collective high five that erupted when Supaidaman, AKA "Japanese Spider-Man", showed up in Amazing Spider-Man #12, as part of the ongoing Spiderverse storyline. Called in from one of the many Marvel parallel universes, his appearance makes Supaidaman canonical within the larger Marvelverse. Cue massive celebration.

Then again, maybe you're wondering why you ought to care. Long version: Moviebob's excellent article about Supaidaman from last summer. Short version: read on.

Now, we all know how bad Marvel used to be at licensing its characters out, and we know also that the late 70s and 80s were particularly awful. Supaidaman, a 1978 collaboration between Marvel and Japanese entertainment conglomerate Toei should have been the worst of the lot. The premise, divorced as it's possible to get from the original, sees a motorcycle racer named Takuya Yamashiro given the Spider-Man uniform and power set by an alien who crash-landed on earth. With plots largely centered around defending Japan against the threat of invading giant monsters and evil invaders, the show basically zips back and forth between conventions mined to exhaustion by, well, every single live action kids show the country produced during the 70s.

Except it turned out to be incredible. First, as a pastiche of the decade's cliches, it actually works, with wonderful fight choreography and, for its day and budget, effects. Sure, Supaidaman is, for some reason, described as an emissary of hell, but translations are difficult when concepts differ so drastically between cultures, and the show comes complete with the single most 1978-sounding disco theme song ever recorded, so we're good. Most importantly, however, Supaidaman had access to a giant, transforming spaceship called Leopardon, the result being that the show gave the world the first ever appearance of a hand-to-hand combat hero piloting a giant, transformable mech in battle.

Supaidaman lasted 40 episodes plus a film (that's a hit in Japan), but never made an impact internationally except as a cheesy artifact of the disco era. Maybe that's why Marvel has quietly ignored the show's existence ever since. Until now. Today's Marvel is, of course, the company that seems almost effortlessly to produce hit films with talking raccoons, which makes it the perfect time for it to embrace and even celebrate stuff like Supaidaman. And so they have, by making several episodes available online, with English subtitles and everything. We've embedded the video for episode one below. Enjoy.

Source: Marvel

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If they started to sell it on dvd I'd buy it day one.

gmaverick019:

Dead Metal:

gmaverick019:

are you referring to the Toie company, or japan? because yes, obviously power rangers came from japan (zyuranger as you said). either way, I just found it funny how they basically turned spiderman into a web power ranger, and the bad guys from the intro look just like the putty's.

I think what he's referring to is that this incarnation of Spider-Man is actually the origin of Power Rangers. The show we know as PR is actually the sequel to the spinoff of this show after they lost the rights to Spider-Man.
This show was incredibly popular and basically started the giant robot trope in Japanese superhero TV shows.

Why are people acting like this is something new? I seem to remember Marvel having the entire show up on their site for free for like the past 5 years at least.

ahh okay, now that makes more sense...for some reason I remember the origin of power rangers just kind of being it's own thing in japan, but nonetheless if this predates it. lol in that case, I'm happy they lost the rights to it, I love power rangers in all its cheesy glory.

There was another show that predates this show that was similar in concept to Power Rangers and by the same people that would later make the show proper, just missing the giant robot, it has recently been retconed into being part of the Sentai canon. But that was a fairly recent thing.

God I love this stuff XD

Dead Metal:

gmaverick019:

Kaimax:

Well they were the ones that actually "invented" it lol. Zyuranger -> Power Rangers

are you referring to the Toie company, or japan? because yes, obviously power rangers came from japan (zyuranger as you said). either way, I just found it funny how they basically turned spiderman into a web power ranger, and the bad guys from the intro look just like the putty's.

I think what he's referring to is that this incarnation of Spider-Man is actually the origin of Power Rangers. The show we know as PR is actually the sequel to the spinoff of this show after they lost the rights to Spider-Man.
This show was incredibly popular and basically started the giant robot trope in Japanese superhero TV shows.

Why are people acting like this is something new? I seem to remember Marvel having the entire show up on their site for free for like the past 5 years at least.

ahh okay, now that makes more sense...for some reason I remember the origin of power rangers just kind of being it's own thing in japan, but nonetheless if this predates it. lol in that case, I'm happy they lost the rights to it, I love power rangers in all its cheesy glory.

gmaverick019:

Kaimax:

gmaverick019:
I just watched the intro...but that looks way to similar to power ranger putty's and a megazord...

Well they were the ones that actually "invented" it lol. Zyuranger -> Power Rangers

are you referring to the Toie company, or japan? because yes, obviously power rangers came from japan (zyuranger as you said). either way, I just found it funny how they basically turned spiderman into a web power ranger, and the bad guys from the intro look just like the putty's.

I think what he's referring to is that this incarnation of Spider-Man is actually the origin of Power Rangers. The show we know as PR is actually the sequel to the spinoff of this show after they lost the rights to Spider-Man.
This show was incredibly popular and basically started the giant robot trope in Japanese superhero TV shows.

Why are people acting like this is something new? I seem to remember Marvel having the entire show up on their site for free for like the past 5 years at least.

Kaimax:

gmaverick019:
I just watched the intro...but that looks way to similar to power ranger putty's and a megazord...

Well they were the ones that actually "invented" it lol. Zyuranger -> Power Rangers

are you referring to the Toie company, or japan? because yes, obviously power rangers came from japan (zyuranger as you said). either way, I just found it funny how they basically turned spiderman into a web power ranger, and the bad guys from the intro look just like the putty's.

SUPAIDAAAAAAAA..... HENSHIN!

So anyone wanna take bet on how long the villain (seriously the villain goal by killing ALL of the multiverse Spider-man is so stupid) will killed the Japanese Spider-man (I mean they killed of Spider-man and his Amazing friend version eventhough he actually got a fanbase)? Still it would be cool if he team up with that Japanese girl Spider-man with the mech.

gmaverick019:
I just watched the intro...but that looks way to similar to power ranger putty's and a megazord...

Well they were the ones that actually "invented" it lol. Zyuranger -> Power Rangers

Never heard of this but I'm honestly not to surprised, worth watching all the same.

This is.... Something I guess? Gotta say I love the theme though.

Adam Jensen:
Man, these Japanese always putting Japanese actors to play white characters. Spidey is whitey! /sarcasm

Something tells me I'm not gonna see much of that in here. It only seems to draw fake outrage when Hollywood does it to female anime cyborg characters.

Sorry, I didn't realise this version of Spiderman was an American living in the U.S. called Peter Parker.

Yay for false equivalence.

P.S. I don't give a shit about Ghost in the Shell, it has never appealed to me.

Man, these Japanese always putting Japanese actors to play white characters. Spidey is whitey! /sarcasm

Something tells me I'm not gonna see much of that in here. It only seems to draw fake outrage when Hollywood does it to female anime cyborg characters.

I just watched the intro...but that looks way to similar to power ranger putty's and a megazord...

still, hilarious, and I'm glad japan keeps coming out with weird shit like that.

Oh my god I'm watching it now and...it's glorious, absolutely glorious. His first transformation, fucking spider-sensei, the goddamn mecha, the whole insane shabbang. It's too amazing to put into words.

And indeed, damn does this have a lot of groovy bass lines amidst the sheer madness of it all.

Watch The First Episode Of Japanese Spider-Man

japanese spiderman leopardon

Prepare to have your mind blown through your web shooters.

Last week, you may have joined in the collective high five that erupted when Supaidaman, AKA "Japanese Spider-Man", showed up in Amazing Spider-Man #12, as part of the ongoing Spiderverse storyline. Called in from one of the many Marvel parallel universes, his appearance makes Supaidaman canonical within the larger Marvelverse. Cue massive celebration.

Then again, maybe you're wondering why you ought to care. Long version: Moviebob's excellent article about Supaidaman from last summer. Short version: read on.

Now, we all know how bad Marvel used to be at licensing its characters out, and we know also that the late 70s and 80s were particularly awful. Supaidaman, a 1978 collaboration between Marvel and Japanese entertainment conglomerate Toei should have been the worst of the lot. The premise, divorced as it's possible to get from the original, sees a motorcycle racer named Takuya Yamashiro given the Spider-Man uniform and power set by an alien who crash-landed on earth. With plots largely centered around defending Japan against the threat of invading giant monsters and evil invaders, the show basically zips back and forth between conventions mined to exhaustion by, well, every single live action kids show the country produced during the 70s.

Except it turned out to be incredible. First, as a pastiche of the decade's cliches, it actually works, with wonderful fight choreography and, for its day and budget, effects. Sure, Supaidaman is, for some reason, described as an emissary of hell, but translations are difficult when concepts differ so drastically between cultures, and the show comes complete with the single most 1978-sounding disco theme song ever recorded, so we're good. Most importantly, however, Supaidaman had access to a giant, transforming spaceship called Leopardon, the result being that the show gave the world the first ever appearance of a hand-to-hand combat hero piloting a giant, transformable mech in battle.

Supaidaman lasted 40 episodes plus a film (that's a hit in Japan), but never made an impact internationally except as a cheesy artifact of the disco era. Maybe that's why Marvel has quietly ignored the show's existence ever since. Until now. Today's Marvel is, of course, the company that seems almost effortlessly to produce hit films with talking raccoons, which makes it the perfect time for it to embrace and even celebrate stuff like Supaidaman. And so they have, by making several episodes available online, with English subtitles and everything. We've embedded the video for episode one below. Enjoy.

Source: Marvel

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